Methods of communication

  • Be strategic with your communications!
  • Forward planning, timing and targeting are essential in ensuring your message gets through to schools and teachers.
  • The Active School Lists provided by the Department of Education and Department of Education Services include general contacts for all schools in Western Australia K-12, public and private. Use these lists as a starting point to create your own contacts database. Active government (public schools) list via Schools Online; Active non-government (private) schools list; Department of Education - Independent Public SchoolsAlphabetical list of Western Australia Schools (all).
  • To request public school address labels, see information provided by the Department of Education here.
  • Consider starting small, and targeting select schools or networks of schools rather than the blanket approach.
  • If you have to call teachers, do it before 8.30am or after 3.10pm and try not to call during lunch. The phone ringing is too disruptive. Ask the teacher via email to advise when is a good time to call them and let them know what hours during the week you are available.
  • Email - Make it concise, clear and specifically directed to the appropriate staff member. Be aware that principals receive approximately 200 emails per day: If you have to email a principal make sure the subject line is relevant and specific. Department of Education (DoE) servers more often than not identify emails as spam and send them directly to the junk mail folder. Check the format and size of email attachments – anything over 1MB and it probably won’t make it into the school or teacher’s in box. Put a hyperlink to you or your company’s website in the body of your email. Including this information will save the teacher/school time and make it easier for them to view your work.
  • The best method of communication is to send a letter with concise information addressed to a specific person or title. Call the school and ask for the name of the Head of Learning area (HOLA) in the case of secondary schools or specialist teacher. The HOLA is more likely to have more time to go through your information than teachers. The HOLA may also be able to ‘table’ your information at their weekly teacher meetings. Add this information to your contact database. For primary schools, try and make contact with the Principal or Deputy Principal.
  • Getting no response doesn’t necessarily mean the school or teacher is not interested. Follow up with an email asking to make a phone appointment with the teacher so you can talk through the information you have sent.
  • Contact the Regional Education Offices for the contact details of the Coordinator Regional Operations (CROs), Coordinator Regional Services (CRSs) and Primary Education and Challenge (PEAC) Coordinator and send information to them.
  • Cells/Networks - secondary school principals regularly meet with the principals of their feeder primary schools (i.e. cells or networks) so this could be a way of getting information out to a number of schools if you have workshops for students or incursions to offer.